Mini MBA

NAICD College demands fait treatment & elimination of all discrimination from either college representatives or students. A respectful fair environment is a basic right for all stakeholders of NAICD College. NAICD is dedicated to creating a positive, discrimination free learning environment for all out students.

 

Any harassment of any kind against students or staff members will not be tolerated. Expulsion will be the result if confirmed. 

 

Students expects to receive fair treatments in:

  • Enrollment
  • Classroom & Learning.
  • Quizzes and Exams.
  • Facility use & information.

 

There will be:

  • Equal opportunity for everyone.
  • Students & staff will have the ability to freely express their opinions.
  • Students & staff will have the ability to freely practice their religious obligations in campus if needed.

There will not be any tolerance for:

  • Physical or verbal abuse. (Please refer to our dismissal policy).
  • Acts of bullying.
  • Sexual harassment.

 

Any discrimination or harassment cases should be directly communicated to: StudentAffairs@naicd.ca

Student affairs will forward it to the College president within 24 hours.

Presidents office would respond within 48 hours.

Dispute Process:

Students must write a formal complaint directed to the Academic Director of their dispute through e-mail.

Academic Director or assigned representative will have a meeting with all parties and look to resolve the situation.

If the dispute still stands, the Academic Director will forward the dispute to the president.

The president will assign a committee that are not involved in any of the above steps. That could include, Faculty member or Administrator.

Committee will consider meeting with all parties and to resolve the dispute at the earliest convenience.

If the results are not satisfactory, students or representatives can file a claim with the Private Training Institutions Branch (PTIB). https://www.privatetraininginstitutions.gov.bc.ca

Lower-Division Requirements (90)

College Writing: 5
College Mathematics: 5
Humanities: 15
Social Sciences: 15
Natural Sciences/Mathematics: 15
Electives: 30
Required Lower Division Courses
IS 201 – Fundamentals of Computing (5)
This course is designed to provide an overview of the fundamentals of computing. Emphasis is placed on the five basic areas of Information Technology (IT): applications, platforms, development, data, and communication. Students will develop their understanding of basic IT concepts, and delve into Information Technology planning and analysis through practical application of current techniques and tools for building a website.
Project Management Core
BC 301

Critical Thinking (5)
The critical thinking process is used to analyze today’s issues and aid the student in identifying rational solutions. Topics examined include: argument analyzing and building; forms and standards of critical thinking; and evaluating sources of information.
BC 302

Professional Communications (5)
This course focuses on the fundamentals of communication in the workplace. Students build professional writing and speaking skills to inform, propose, and persuade. Students will also engage in analyzing a case study, developing PowerPoint slides, making an oral presentation and writing e-mail messages, announcements, memos, letters, and reports. Students will learn how to identify an issue, conduct research, organize research findings, and present an argument. Additional topics include formatting business documents and communicating with different audiences.
BSC 407

The Effective Organization (5)
This course investigates dilemmas that routinely plague organizations as well as possible solutions to these dilemmas. Topics include diversity within the organization; conflict and negotiation; perception, motivation and reinforcement; leadership roles throughout the organization; human resource management and team building; organizational cultures; design and information technology; and organizational change and development.
PM 401

Introduction to Project Management (5)
Introduction to Project Management utilizes a real team project to manage a project’s life cycle. Emphasis is placed on activity networks, managing resources, and creating control mechanisms that minimize risk. Project leadership is explored in the context of building effective project teams and maintaining stakeholder relationships. Students will learn and apply basic project management concepts including time and resource constraints, planning, scheduling, work breakdown structure, Gantt Charts, network diagrams, and project control.
PM 404

Project Scheduling and Cost Management (5)
Project Scheduling and Cost Management exposes students to the techniques and tools for project scheduling and cost management. This course includes detailed discussions and a series of related learning exercises on the sequence of project activities, including creating work breakdown structures, creating integrated networks, scheduling, and project cost and schedule controls. Cost management introduces the basic approaches and methods associated with cost management, from the establishment of budgets and cost accounts to the monitoring, interpretation, and use of cost data throughout the life cycle of the project. Required prerequisites: PM 401. Recommended prerequisites: PM 409, PM 410.
PM 406

Project Risk and Change Management (5)
This course utilizes a simulated project to teach students how to manage risk and crisis occurrence through a project’s life cycle. Strong emphasis is placed on integrating SWOT, Risk Breakdown Structure, and Risk Mitigation into the overarching project life cycle. Project leadership is explored in the context of building effective project teams and maintaining stakeholder relationships, especially in times of uncertainty and crisis. Students will learn and apply basic project management concepts related to identifying, classifying, and mitigating risk. Prerequisites: PM 404 and PM 408.
PM 408

People and Communication in Projects (5)
This course provides an overview of people and communication factors in managing projects. Topics include human resource planning; how teams work; managing conflict; social and relationship capital in the context of projects; managing behaviors; diversity; leadership pitfalls; and communication factors within a project environment. Required prerequisites: PM 401, PM 409. Recommended prerequisites: PM 404, PM 410, BC 302.
PM 409

Leadership and Teams (5)
In this course, students will explore techniques for effective leadership and team management. Students will examine how to lead and participate on teams and manage change. Special emphasis is placed on team development and the ability to lead and work on geographically distributed teams. This course focuses on how to build and sustain alignment among team members by focusing on improved coordination, communication, and collaboration among team members regardless of geographical location.
PM 410

Project Initiation, Scope, and Stakeholder Management (5)
This course expands on the foundation of project management by focusing in depth on the initiation process phase of a project. It will cover important topics such as the role of the project manager, company culture, identification of important stakeholders, and aligning project priority with the organizational portfolio. At the end of the course, students will be able to develop a project charter based on business goals and initiate a project.
PM 413

Project Performance and Quality Assurance (5)
Project Performance and Quality Assurance focuses on providing the student with tools and techniques to ensure that a project achieves the desired level of quality outcome. Students will learn about quality, who defines it and how it is defined, and tools and techniques such as quality plans, control charts, peer review, check lists, and process mapping. The student will have an opportunity to practice managing a process improvement project where they define baseline measures, identify key performance indicators, and use tools like process mapping to improve an everyday activity. Prerequisites: PM 406.
PM 414

Project Resource and Procurement Management (5)
This course will focus on using a simulated project to teach students how to assess and proactively manage project resources and demonstrate project procurement practices. Project procurement addresses acquisition of resources which may include people, services, equipment, facilities, or funding. Students will explore obtaining goods and services from outside companies by understanding the procurement process, creating procurement documentation, and contract management. Strong emphasis is placed on effectively planning, scheduling, monitoring, and controlling project resources through the creation of a resource management plan. Prerequisites: PM 406.
PM 415

Agile/Scrum Methodologies (5)
This course provides an introduction and overview of agile methodologies as applied within project management. Topics include the development of a product backlog, determining how to calculate the optimal sprint capacity, determining priorities, building a sprint backlog, executing sprint development, reporting sprint progress to management, delivering value and retrospection. Students will learn and apply basic agile/scrum methodologies. Prerequisites: PM 406.

English Faculty

Ling Luong

Ling Luong

A Q&A with Linh Luong, Academic Program Director, Project Management

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?
A: I have a Master’s in Business Administration and a Master’s in Information Systems.

Q: What do you do for fun?
A: Plan cooking competitions, hiking, paddle boarding, and spending time with my husband and daughter.

Q: What classes do you teach?
A: During my time at CityU I’ve taught various project management classes.

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?
A: I wanted to give back the way my teachers/mentors taught me.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?
A: It’s that light bulb moment and passion that you see in students.

Q: What’s one thing you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?
A: Make all your mistakes in the classroom and learn from it. The real world is less forgiving.

Q: What is something that you have learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?
A: Relating experiences, concepts, and topics back to the real world helps things click more with students.

Physics Faculty

Ling Luong

Ling Luong

A Q&A with Linh Luong, Academic Program Director, Project Management

Q: What is your terminal degree in and where did you get it from?
A: I have a Master’s in Business Administration and a Master’s in Information Systems.

Q: What do you do for fun?
A: Plan cooking competitions, hiking, paddle boarding, and spending time with my husband and daughter.

Q: What classes do you teach?
A: During my time at CityU I’ve taught various project management classes.

Q: Why did you decide to start teaching?
A: I wanted to give back the way my teachers/mentors taught me.

Q: Why do you enjoy teaching at CityU?
A: It’s that light bulb moment and passion that you see in students.

Q: What’s one thing you always tell your students that may or may not relate to your class?
A: Make all your mistakes in the classroom and learn from it. The real world is less forgiving.

Q: What is something that you have learned from end-of-course evaluations that you applied later on?
A: Relating experiences, concepts, and topics back to the real world helps things click more with students.